BP BS

Alright, this may be the only time I have something in common with Prez. Obama – my late response to the BP oil … diaster.

    Diaster isn’t even the right word.. this is.. so awful I’m still in denial about the thing. That’s the truth, I can’t fathom the irreparable, irreversible damage and on going damage we (human beings) have committed here.

   Don’t think you’re innocent, we’re all in this together. Anyone who has ever burned a fossil fuel.. we’re all guilty. We all use energy and I’m willing to go out on a limb to say we all abuse it too. We consume consume consume.. it’s gotta come from somewhere. Yet we like to think we’re so ‘green’ turning off lights every now and then.. or using reusable bags.. but.. we haven’t changed at all. Everyday we get worse and take/consume more. But now we tell ourselves it’s okay because.. we did something good for the environment when we bought all new lights or when we bitched at someone to pick up their litter … : /

   How many pelicans did that save? Yea.. exactly.

   Anyway, I’m ranting too much ..just.. if you want a picture of idiocy (not the actual photograph but.. an article describing it) read about British Petro’s .. no plan about saving nothing from no oil spill …   Yea, you think that doesn’t make sense? Read below.

BP memo
shows spill plan faults

By The
Associated Press, cbc.ca,
Updated:
June 9, 2010 11:07 PM

BP memo shows spill plan faults

Professor Peter Lutz is listed in
BP’s 2009 response plan for a Gulf of Mexico oil spill as a national
wildlife expert. He died in 2005.

Under the heading "sensitive
biological resources," the plan lists marine mammals including walruses,
sea otters, sea lions and seals. None lives anywhere near the Gulf.

The
names and phone numbers of several Texas A&M University marine life
specialists are wrong. So are the numbers for marine mammal stranding
network offices in Louisiana and Florida, which are no longer in
service.

BP PLC’s 582-page regional spill plan for the Gulf, and
its 52-page, site-specific plan for the Deepwater Horizon rig are
riddled with omissions and glaring errors, according to an Associated
Press analysis that details how
BP officials have pretty much been
making it up as they go along.

The lengthy plans approved by the
federal government last year before BP drilled its ill-fated well vastly
understate the dangers posed by an uncontrolled leak and vastly
overstate the company’s preparedness to deal with one.

"BP
Exploration and Production Inc. has the capability to respond, to the
maximum extent practicable, to a worst case discharge, or a substantial
threat of such a discharge, resulting from the activities proposed in
our Exploration Plan," the oil giant stated in its Deepwater Horizon
plan.

In the spill scenarios detailed in the documents, fish,
marine mammals and birds escape serious harm; beaches remain pristine;
water quality is only a temporary problem
. And those are the projections

for a leak about 10 times worse than what has been calculated for the
ongoing disaster.

Billy Nungesser, president of Plaquemines
Parish, La., says
there are "3,000 acres [of wetlands] where life as we
know it is dead, and we continue to lose precious marshland every day."

There
are other wildly false assumptions. BP’s proposed method to calculate
spill volume based on the darkness of the oil sheen is way off. The
internationally accepted formula would produce estimates 100 times
higher.

The Gulf’s loop current, which is projected to help
eventually send oil hundreds of miles around Florida’s southern tip and
up the Atlantic coast, isn’t mentioned in either plan.

The
website listed for Marine Spill Response Corp. — one of two firms that
BP relies on for equipment to clean a spill — links to a defunct
Japanese-language page.

In early May, at least 80 Louisiana state
prisoners were trained to clean birds by listening to a presentation
and watching a video. It was a work force never envisioned in the plans,
which contain no detailed references to how birds will be cleansed of
oil.

A containment cap

This week, after BP reported the
seemingly good news that a containment cap installed on the wellhead was
funneling some of the gushing crude to a tanker on the surface,
BP
introduced a whole new new set of plans mostly aimed at capturing more
oil.

The latest incarnation calls for building a larger cap,
using a special incinerator to burn off some of the recaptured oil and
bringing in a floating platform to process the oil being sucked away
from the gushing well.

In other words, the on-the-fly planning
continues.

While a disaster as devastating as a major oil spill
will create some problems that can’t be solved in advance, or even
foreseen, BP’s plans do not anticipate even the most obvious issues.

In
responses to lengthy lists of questions from AP, officials for BP and
the Interior Department, which oversees oil rig regulator Minerals
Management Service, appear to concede there were problems with the two
oil spill response plans.

"Many of the questions you raise are
exactly those questions that will be examined and answered by the
presidential commission as well as other investigations into BP’s oil
spill," said Kendra Barkoff, spokeswoman for Interior Secretary Ken
Salazar. She added that
Salazar has undertaken transformational reforms
of MMS.

Said BP spokesman Daren Beaudo from Robert, La.: "We
expect that a complete review of the regional response plans and
planning process will take place as part of the overall incident
investigation
so that we can determine what worked well and what needs
improvement.

"Thus far we have implemented the largest spill
response in history and many, many elements of it have worked well.
However, we are greatly disappointed that oil has made landfall and
impacted shorelines and marshes. The situation we are dealing with is
clearly complex, unprecedented and will offer us much to learn from."

A
key failure of the plan’s cleanup provisions was the scarcity of
floating lines of plastic or absorbent material placed around sensitive
areas to deflect oil.

From the start, local officials all along
the Gulf Coast have complained about a lack of supplies, particularly
the heavier, so-called ocean boom.

But even BP says in its
regional plan that boom isn’t effective in seas more than a metre or a
little higher; waves in the Gulf are often bigger. And even in calmer
waters, oil has swamped vital wildlife breeding grounds in places
supposedly sequestered by multiple layers of boom.

The BP plans
speak of thorough resources for all; there’s no talk of a need to share.
Still, Alabama Gov. Bob Riley said his shores were left vulnerable by
Coast Guard decisions to shift boom to Louisiana when the oil threatened
landfall there.

Meanwhile, in Louisiana’s Plaquemines Parish,
Nungesser and others have complained that kilometres of the boom now in
the water were not properly anchored. AP reporters saw evidence he was
right —
some lines of boom were so broken up they hardly impeded the
slick’s push to shore
.

Some out-of-state contractors who didn’t
know local waters placed boom where tides and currents made sure it
didn’t work properly. And yet disorganization has dogged efforts to use
local boats.

In Venice, La., near where the Mississippi River
empties into the Gulf, a large group of charter captains have been known
to spend their days sitting around at the marina, earning $2,000 a day
without ever attacking the oil.

But perhaps the most glaring
error in BP’s plans involves Lutz, the professor, one of several dozen
experts recommended as resources to be contacted in the event of a
spill.

Lutz is listed as a go-to wildlife specialist at the
University of Miami. But Lutz, an eminent sea turtle expert, left Miami
almost 20 years ago to chair the marine biology department at Florida
Atlantic University in Boca Raton.
He died four years before the plan
was published.

Article as seen on CBC’s website: http://news.ca.msn.com/world/cbc-article.aspx?cp-documentid=24520576

  Just.. un.. believable.. un.. fathomable.. I’m at a loss for.. any words here… sadness All I’ve got is sadness for sea dwellers.. and pelicans. I like pelicans.. poor guy.

 

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About yolandalenin

I talk a lot. ______________________________________________________________________ I write even more.
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